CPR for Bulldogs

Knowing how to do CPR for Bulldogs is something you should learn. No matter how much effort we put into keeping our Bulldogs safe and away from harm, they can still get in to accidents, get choked, or drown.

CPR stands for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. It is a procedure composed of chest compressions and artificial respiration that is done when an individual stops breathing and has undetectable and absent heart beat. When the dog stops breathing, this will lead the heart to go into cardiac arrest and stop beating.

Read: Taking Care of Bulldog Wrinkles

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Do note that doing CPR on a healthy dog can be dangerous and can cause physical problems that may result to death.  You may perform CPR on your Bulldog if he is:

  • Unconscious,
  • Not responsive,
  • Has no heartbeat,
  • And not breathing,

Artificial Respiration during CPR for Bulldogs

Before starting artificial respiration on an unconscious Bulldog, it’s important to check the vital signs first. Rub your Bulldog and talk to him, if he’s not responsive, you may now proceed to do a CPR.

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Call emergency help as fast as you can. You may call an emergency veterinarian or your Bulldog’s regular veterinarian to let them know you are coming while someone else is performing a CPR on your Bulldog. Or you may also have someone call the emergency vet while you perform CPR on your Bulldog.

  1. Lay your Bulldog on his right side and check his pulse. Choose to lay your Bulldog on his right side so that his heart is facing up.
  2. Now, feel your Bulldog’s pulse by bring his left leg elbow back to the chest. Take note that the spot where the elbow meets the chest will be the 3rd to 5th chest space – and that is where your Bulldog’s heart is found. Feel the area or try to see if you can hear his heart beating.
  3. If you cannot feel or hear through the heart pulse point, check the wrist. To do this, you can run your finger along your Bulldog’s dewclaw pad on either front or back foot and look for a pulse. If there is faint or no pulse heard or felt, proceed to perform CPR.
  4. Check your Bulldog’s airways to see if there is anything blocking it. Remove any debris, vomit, mucus, blood, or any foreign material that is causing the blockage.
  5. Pull your Bulldog’s tongue forward and align his head with the back – slightly tilting in back. This step should help clear up the airway.
  6. Put your one hand under your Bulldog’s lower jaw to close it. Place your thumb (the one on the same hand) on top of your Bulldog’s nose and hold the mouth shut so that the air cannot leave your Bulldog’s mouth.
  7. Place your mouth over your Bulldog’s mouth and nose and blow four to five quick breaths. Make sure that the chest is rising as you do this.
  8. Wait two to three seconds so that air will exhale on its own. Continue breathing into your Bulldog’s mouth until he breathes on his own. Do note that this can take as long as 60 minutes. Carry on with the artificial respiration until the vet is able to insert an oxygen tube in your Bulldog’s airway and provide mechanical ventilation.

Chest Compressions during CPR for Bulldogs

If your Bulldog’s heartbeat has stopped or still remains unresponsive even with artificial respiration, then it time to perform chest compressions along with it.

  1. Put your Bulldog on his back to expose his rounded chest.
  2. Place your hand on your Bulldog’s chest – on the area opposite of your Bulldog’s front leg elbow.
  3. Put your hands together and lock your fingers. Then, lock your elbows.
  4. Pump your Bulldog’s chest gently but firmly 15 times in 10 seconds.
  5. Breathe into your Bulldog’s mouth once again – still covering the muzzle to make sure that the air you’re breathing into the mouth does not go out.
  6. Take note that ratio for CPR is: 15 compressions to one breath.
  7. You may also do an abdominal squeeze on your Bulldog to aid in the recirculation of blood into the heart.
  8. Carry on with the artificial respiration and chest compression combination.

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